New Arrivals, Current Reading May 20 – 26, 2013

NEW ARRIVALS:
     I went to Robert’s Books in Lincoln City while we were over on the coast for a few days. I had a list, mostly of some Mike Shayne novels I’m still missing, of which Robert’s had none. I did pick up some John D. MacDonald stand-alone novels, as per George Kelly’s ongoing Friday Forgotten series on Ed Gorman’s list of favorites. Also some science fiction It was a pleasure to look at the original artwork and browse the musty shelves again, even if I didn’t get a lot of books. Here’s the goods:

Deadly Welcome by John D. MacDonald [Fawcett Gold Medal 1959 paperback, used] – mystery novel – stand-alone novel. This and the other MacDonald books listed this week are on Ed Gorman’s favorite non-McGee novels by JDM. I’ve only read one of the books on the list so I picked up a few. The unattributed cover art is by Robert McGinnis.

Murder in the Wind by John D. MacDonald [Fawcett Gold Medal 1956 paperback, used] – mystery novel – stand-alone novel. This and the other MacDonald books listed this week are on Ed Gorman’s favorite non-McGee novels by JDM. The unattributed cover artwork is by Robert McGinnis.

Soft Touch by John D. MacDonald [Fawcett Gold Medal 1971 paperback, used] – mystery novel – stand-alone novel. This and the other MacDonald books listed this week are on Ed Gorman’s favorite non-McGee novels by JDM. The oh-so-70s artwork is unattributed.

 – ∞ – – ∞ – – ∞ – – ∞ – – ∞ – – ∞ – 

Readers of this blog may have noticed that I pick up Gordon R. Dickson novels and stories when I come across them in used book stores. Dickson has long been a favorite, since reading his work in Astounding Science Fiction and other digests back in the day.

The Book of Gordon Dickson by Gordon R. Dickson [DAW 1970 paperback, used] – science fiction short stories – originally issued under the title Danger – Human the stories in this are mostly from the Fifties and early Sixties.

Naked to the Stars by Gordon R. Dickson [DAW 1977 paperback, used] – science fiction novel – copyrighted in 1961, this novel pre-dates Joe Haldeman’s Forever War by 13 years but has been compared to it. Some consider this to be Dickson’s best work. I may have read it before I started keeping records of my reading, but don’t remember so it goes on the TBR.

The Court of A Thousand Suns by Allan Cole and Chris Bunch [Del Rey 1986 paperback, used] – science fiction novel – this is the third in the Sten series, and no, I don’t have nor have I read the first two. That’s okay, I’ll read this one and if I like it enough I’ll go back and find the others. Cover art is by David Mattingly.

D-99 by H.B. Fyfe [Pyramid 1962 paperback, used] – science fiction novel – this novel caught my eye on the shelf because of the distinctive yellow Pyramid spine. Though I’ve read some short stories by Fyfe, this is new to me and sounded interesting. It’s one of those secret-agency-that-solves-all-problems SF novels, which are usually a lot of fun. I’m looking forward to seeing what Fyfe does with the scenario. The unfortunate artwork is by Ralph Brillhart.

CURRENT READING
     I took a thick book of pulp stories on our trip last week. It turned out to be a poor choice, or perhaps I wasn’t in the mood to read. I kept staring out the usually rain-spattered window, watching the waves, the people and dogs walking on the beach, the clouds roll in. I think I read half of a story the whole time. I don’t know what would have been a better vacation reading choice, but no matter.

I finished The Honey Thief which I didn’t like much and won’t be reviewing. I finished the 3rd and 4th of the Enchanted Forest Chronicles and while they were fun they were really just fluff. Just now I’m halfway through a Perry Mason novel and am involved in moving books about the house as we finally got some new bookshelves. It’s possible that, for a time, I’ll have more shelves than I need. When’s the last time that happened? I sure don’t remember. [Post on new shelves coming soon].

What did you get, new, used or from the library, and
what have you been reading?

About Richard Robinson

Enjoying life in Portland, OR
This entry was posted in books, Current Reading, mystery, New Arrivals, science fiction and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to New Arrivals, Current Reading May 20 – 26, 2013

  1. Patti Abbott says:

    Reading a Bill Pronzini book, THEIR EYES ARE WATCHING GOD (Hurston) and THE WoMAN UPSTAIRS (Messud).

  2. Jeff Meyerson says:

    Patti, I read the Hurston in college.

    I’ve never read Gordon Dickson but you are tempting me with a couple of those titles, Rick.

    New arrivals: two, both from PaperbackSwap.com. First was from a blog recommendation (I think it was James Reasoner), Robert McCammon’s short story collection, Blue World. The second was another collection, this one edited by Doug Greene: Classic Mystery Stories, including tales by Poe, Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Jacques Futrelle and H. C. Bailey, among others. It was a Dover Thrift Edition.

    I finished three more books last week. First was the previously mentioned The Last Policeman by Ben H. Winters, which won the Edgar Award fopr Best Paperback Original. It has a premise I couldn’t resist. Young detective Henry Palace in Concord, New Hampshire keeps at his job while so many are abandoning theirs as an asteroid is going to hit the Earth in six months, possibly ending life as we know it. It was announced as the first of a trilogy and I liked it a lot.

    Next was the most recent collection by North Carolina author Ron Rash, the third of his I’ve read, Nothing Gold Can Stay. I like his writing and for me the outstanding story in the book was “Twenty-Six Days” about a couple counting the days until their daughter’s return from Afghanistan.

    Last was Daniel Pinkwater’s young adult book The Neddiad, recommended by Bill Crider who clearly liked it a lot more than I did. It was OK I thought but it just didn’t tickle me the way I think it was supposed to do.

  3. Oh ho! Really nice collection of new arrivals. Fun to see the MacDonald books after reading George’s reviews of late.

  4. Richard says:

    Patti, sounds like good stuff.

  5. Richard says:

    Jeff, that McCammon collection has been getting a lot of ink lately. I figure I’ve likely read the contents of the Greene-edited collection. That Ben Winters book does sound good. I’ll have to check the library for it. (uh oh). I’ve had mixed opinions of Pinkwater, some I though was great, some pretty meh.

  6. Richard says:

    Carl, I thought of you when saw the cover on that Sten novel. I’m planning on reading one of the MacDonald books this Spring-Summer.

  7. Nice bunch of books! Those JDMs are well worth reading. I’m reviewing SOFT TOUCH this week for FFB. Like you, I’ve been a fan of Gordon R. Dickson for decades. He’s a very underrated writer. When I travel, I usually bring something like THE AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE with me. Reading reviews of CDs uses a different part of the brain than reading short stories.

  8. I agree with Jeff. I’m tempted to read Gordon R. Dickson’s sf books too. It’d be a first when I do. I just finished reading IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT by John Ball though I saw and reviewed the film much earlier. Ball writes well and I’m glad I’ve a couple of his Virgil Tibbs novels to go. I’m currently reading BREAKHEART PASS by Alistair MacLean, probably his only western novel. It was also made into a film. I’m also contemplating reading a western, HARD TEXAS WINTER, by Preston Lewis, another first.

  9. cgramlich says:

    You’re in for a treat with “Murder in the Wind.”

  10. For several years, MacDonald made a decent living writing mysteries, Westerns, crime stories, and science fiction for the pulps. Then, in 1950, just as the demand for paperback books was increasing, he made the crossover to full-length fiction with The Brass Cupcake, a classic hardboiled detective novel featuring mobsters, corrupt cops, and a disaffected loner who falls for a beautiful woman. The writer had found his niche!

  11. You’ll probably like the Sten series. i read them some years back, I think getting them as they came out.

  12. Jeff Meyerson says:

    OK, you sold me. I ordered NAKED TO THE STARS and some short stories by Dickson.

  13. Richard says:

    Randy, I probably should try to get the first ones and read them in order, yes?

    Jeff, Bookswap, I presume?

  14. Cap'n Bob says:

    I have a batch of pulp stories on the Kindle I’m working my way through. Just finished No Survivors, by Will Henry.

  15. Jeff Meyerson says:

    Yes, PaperbackSwap. They have a surprisingly large number of Dickson’s books available and I have over 50 credits, so….

  16. Luciano I. Fitzgerald says:

    For several years, MacDonald made a decent living writing mysteries, Westerns, crime stories, and science fiction for the pulps. Then, in 1950, just as the demand for paperback books was increasing, he made the crossover to full-length fiction with The Brass Cupcake, a classic hardboiled detective novel featuring mobsters, corrupt cops, and a disaffected loner who falls for a beautiful woman. The writer had found his niche!

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