New Arrivals January 17-23

Sorry I didn’t get this up yesterday, I was hip deep in getting my print apazine done and sent out to the Official Editor. So while many bloggers are reading the Forgotten Films posts, here are my New Arrivals. Seven things this week, continuing the recent trend toward pulp reprint goodness and related items and with one eagerly awaited SF novel.

Gang Pulp – John Locke, ed. [Off Trail Publications, 2008 trade paper, new] – pulp reprint short stories – I read of this on Laurie Powers blog Laurie’s Wild West, and decided to get it. I’ve not read any of the gang and gangster pulp stories, it will be interesting to read some. I’ve given you the front and back covers so you can read theback cover text.

I wrote this inaccurate-through-ignorance statement in the original post: A note on Off-Trail Publications: this company of a half dozen or less employees doesn’t name an editor for their books, thus none is shown. They have a lot of interesting books available.

Many thanks indeed to Tom Roberts of Black Dog books for the following. This clarifies things and that’s always good! I have updated this post to reflect this information.

“Off Trail Publications titles are produced by John Locke. He is a one-man operation. John Locke puts together his titles, researches and writes the introductions, proofreads, edits and pens any extra copy.

It seems to border on megalomania when you credit yourself fourteen times for every job involved with producing a book. So that is why some small press operations do not credit every task. There have been some small operations that use pseudonyms, or created entities when crediting their production tasks, once again to keep a single name off the credits numerous times and give the impression to be a larger operation that it actually is.”

Tom has some additional remarks, see his comments below.

The Green Hornet Chronicles edited by Joe Gentile [Moonstone Entertainment 2010 trade paperback, new] – Nineteen new Green Hornet stories by a host of good to excellent authors, including James Reasoner, on whose blog I first learned of this collection. I’ve read the first two stories already and enjoyed them very much.

Grottos of Chinatown “The Dorus Noel Stories” by Arthur J. Burks, edited by John Locke [Off-Trail  Publications 2009 trade paper, new] – a reprint of the eleven Noel stories, all originally published by Dell in 1933-1934 issues of All Detective Magazine.  Burks has been referred to as “the speed king of the pulps” for the amount of work he was able to complete in a short time. Did quality suffer? We’ll see.

Half Share by Nathan Lowell [Ridan Publishing, 2011 trade paper, new, signed and inscribed] – science fiction novel – this is the second of the Trader’s Tale series by Lowell, all available in podcast, but this just available in print format. I loved the first book and have been eagerly awaiting this one! Top of the list!

Rick Lai’s Secret Histories: Daring Adventurers by Rick Lai, [Altus Press 2009 trade paper, new] – pulp reference – articles on pulp fiction heroes and villains, most revised since original publication during the 1980s and 1990s in Pulp Vault and Pulp Collector. Here we have a look at the Avenger, Singapore Sammy, El Borak, Sgt Jaeger, Sir Henry Merrivale, Peter the Brazen, Fu Manchu, Raffles, Capt. Wentworth, Holmes-Lupin rivalry, and a lot more.

Rick Lai’s Secret Histories: Criminal Masterminds by Rick Lai, [Altus Press 2009 trade paper, new] – pulp reference – articles on pulp fiction heroes and villains, most revised since original publication during the 1980s and 1990s in Pulp Vault and Pulp Collector. Here we have essays on Wu Fang, Captain Nemo, the Zardoff brothers, Feathered Serpent, Astar of Opar, Moriarty’s daughter, Si-Fan and many others. Think of this as volume two of Lai’s essays.

The Phantom Detective Companion edited by Tom Johnson [Altus Press 2009 trade paper, new] – pulp reference – With roots going back to Mr. Death in 1932, The Phantom Detective had a twenty year run in his own magazine, longer than, though with less cases, either The Shadow or Doc Savage. This book gives every issue, with a small cover shot (all black and white) for each, the title of the novel, the characters, and a summary. I’ve not read any Phantom Detective stories, but this will no doubt have me searching for reprints.

About Richard Robinson

Enjoying life in Portland, OR
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17 Responses to New Arrivals January 17-23

  1. Jeff Meyerson says:

    My #1 new arrival of the week (yay!) was Nathan Lowell’s Half Share which I wanted to get before we left for Florida. I also got the latest of Andrea Camilleri’s books about Sicilian Insp. Salvo Montalbano, The Track of Sand.

  2. Evan Lewis says:

    OK, I’m ready to salivate.

  3. Jeff Meyerson says:

    Is this a tease?

    😉

  4. Richard says:

    Nope, here you go!

  5. Some nice stuff here. I have one, the Lowell of course(mine’s not inscribed, darn!).

    I’ve not read any of the original Phantom Detective tales, but did read the new one, THE PHANTOM”S PHANTOM by Robert Reginald. He promised another later, though I haven’t seen it yet.

  6. Richard says:

    Randy, haven’t read the Reginald, but now it’s one I have to look for.

  7. Carl V. says:

    Another fantastic set of eye-catching, mouth-watering book covers. I have been excited about the Nathan Lowell books since you mentioned them, and the cover for Half Share is gorgeous.

  8. What a marvelous selection of goodies! Now, to order some for myself!

  9. Richard says:

    Keep it up, George, you’ll need plenty of reading for your convalescence. I continue t be impressed with the offerings from Altus Press, and Off-Trail is doing a good job too.

    Carl – mouth-watering indeed. I haven’t started Half Share yet and I’m already impatient for the next book in the series.

  10. Todd Mason says:

    Me, I’m just happy about how many A HITCHCOCK PRESENTS: hardcovers I’m amassing…a neat little stack. Today’s entry was STORIES MY MOTHER NEVER TOLD ME…one of Robert Arthur’s, with Theodore Sturgeon’s SOME OF YOUR BLOOD included.

  11. Carl V. says:

    I know you aren’t into podcasts…or at least I seem to remember you saying something to that effect, but I might actually just start listening to the Lowell podcasts just to check them out.

  12. Evan Lewis says:

    Hm. Those Rick Lai books look pretty tempting.

  13. Richard says:

    Drop by sometime and take a look.

  14. Tom Roberts says:

    Off Trail Publications titles are produced by John Locke. He is a one-man operation.

    Several years ago someone was putting together an index/ list of all my early Black Dog Books chapbooks. After it appeared online, all the “about the author” columns and other such additional text material was listed as by “anonymous.” I questioned the individual who assembled and posted the list as to why he had credited it that way. “Well, there was no author listed,” was his response. To which I replied: “But you know me personally and know very well that I am a one-man show. Just who the hell do you think wrote all that material?” So now I credit everything.

    Anyway, back to Off Trail Publications.

    John Locke puts together his titles, researches and writes the introductions, proofreads, edits and pens any extra copy.

    It seems to border on megalomania when you credit yourself fourteen times for every job involved with producing a book. So that is why some small press operations do not credit every task.

    There have been some small operations that use pseudonyms, or created entities when crediting their production tasks, once again to keep a single name off the credits numerous times and give the impression to be a larger operation that it actually is.

  15. Tom Roberts says:

    Rick, regarding your question about THE GREEN HORNET CHRONICLES. No, Joe Gentile is not a pseudonym. I have done work for Moonstone and know both Joe and his sister. Joe is the co-publisher of all the Moonstone trade paperback and comics line. Nice guy.

  16. Richard says:

    Thanks a bunch, Tom! I’ve made some changes and quoted part of your comments in the body of the post. I’ll also post a correction n a day or two. I really, appreciate you coming to the blog for a visit, you are always very welcome indeed.

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