the Classical Music Grammies

There’s a lot more to the Grammy Awards than the stuff you see on the hard-sell television broadcast. Here are the results of what I consider the REAL Grammy Awards (the ones where you don’t have to shake your butt to win).

2009 classical music Grammy award winners:

Best Engineered Album, Classical
Traditions And Transformations: Sounds Of Silk Road Chicago –  David Frost, Tom Lazarus & Christopher Willis, engineers (Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Alan Gilbert, Silk Road Ensemble, Wu Man, Yo-Yo Ma & Chicago Symphony Orchestra) [CSO Resound]

Producer Of The Year, Classical
David Frost –  for Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic), Right Through The Bone — Julius Röntgen Chamber Music (ARC Ensemble), Schubert: Sonata In D Maj.; Liszt: Don Juan Fantasy (Min Kwon), Traditions And Transformations: Sounds Of Silk Road Chicago, (Miguel Harth-Bedoya, Alan Gilbert, Yo-Yo Ma, Silk Road Ensemble, Wu Man & Chicago Symphony Orchestra)

Best Classical Album
Weill: Rise And Fall Of The City Of Mahagonny –  James Conlon, conductor; Anthony Dean Griffey, Patti LuPone & Audra McDonald; Fred Vogler, producer (Donnie Ray Albert, John Easterlin, Steven Humes, Mel Ulrich & Robert Wörle; Los Angeles Opera Chorus; Los Angeles Opera Orchestra) [Naxos EuroArts]

Best Orchestral Performance
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 4 –  Bernard Haitink, conductor (Chicago Symphony Orchestra) [CSO Resound]

Best Opera Recording
Weill: Rise And Fall Of The City Of Mahagonny –  James Conlon, conductor; Anthony Dean Griffey, Patti LuPone & Audra McDonald; Fred Vogler, producer (Donnie Ray Albert, John Easterlin, Steven Humes, Mel Ulrich & Robert Wörle; Los Angeles Opera Orchestra; Los Angeles Opera Chorus) [Naxos EuroArts]

Best Choral Performance
Symphony Of Psalms –  Sir Simon Rattle, conductor; Simon Halsey, chorus master (Berliner Philharmoniker; Rundfunkchor Berlin), Track from: Stravinsky: Symphonies [EMI Classics]

Best Instrumental Soloist(s) Performance (with Orchestra)
Schoenberg/Sibelius: Violin Concertos –  Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor; Hilary Hahn (Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra) [Deutsche Grammophon]

Best Instrumental Soloist Performance (without Orchestra)
Piano Music Of Salonen, Stucky, And Lutoslawski –  Gloria Cheng [Telarc]

Best Chamber Music Performance
Carter, Elliott: String Quartets Nos. 1 And 5 –  Pacifica Quartet [Naxos]

Best Small Ensemble Performance
Spotless Rose: Hymns To The Virgin Mary –  Charles Bruffy, conductor; Phoenix Chorale [Chandos]

Best Classical Vocal Performance
Corigliano: Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Poems Of Bob Dylan –  Hila Plitmann (JoAnn Falletta; Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra) [Naxos]

Best Classical Contemporary Composition
Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Poems Of Bob Dylan –  John Corigliano (JoAnn Falletta), Track from: Corigliano: Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Poems Of Bob Dylan [Naxos]

Best Classical Crossover Album
Simple Gifts –  The King’s Singers [Signum Records]

There you have it. Note that there are also grammy awards given in the jazz music genre.

About Richard Robinson

Enjoying life in Portland, OR
This entry was posted in Classical Music, Personal Opinion and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to the Classical Music Grammies

  1. Todd Mason says:

    Well, in the ’80s and ’90s, there Was an unfortunate tendency for every woman performer, at least, to have to have as much a cheesecake a photo as possible on their classical releases.

    Even as a devotee of pulchritude, that was, shall we put it, rather blatant.

  2. Carl V. says:

    I for one wasn’t complaining when classical music went sexy! 😉

    I used to listen to classical music so much more than I do now. I really need to pull out those CD’s and play them more often…might be just the stress reliever I need in the evenings.

    It is too bad these folks don’t get the television recognition they deserve, because their talent is arguably better than much of what is touted as music on the center stage of the awards shows.

  3. Richard says:

    Todd – I think they are still doing that when they can.

    Carl – Yep, get them out, play them, take the opportunity to listen carefully, if you can. The time I spend really paying attention to classicl music, in an otherwise quiet, uninterrupted place, eyes closed, just flowing along with what I’m hearing, is some of the best musical time I have.

  4. I think there are too many Grammys handed out. And too many award shows. Mozart never won an award.

  5. Todd Mason says:

    That’s in part because Mozart would’ve punched everyone if he didn’t win every award at the ceremony…

  6. Richard says:

    True, but he got to visit the Esterházy palace a lot.

  7. Richard says:

    Todd – as opposed to the well-tempered Beethoven. 🙂

  8. Todd Mason says:

    Bach, conversely, knew how to live.

  9. Patti Abbott says:

    I hadn’t watched the Grammys in years. After the show this year, I will go back to not watching it. It was like the Cirque du Soleil. I could barely hear a voice amidst the chaos.

  10. I agree with Patti. The Grammys are as entertaining now as a trip to the dentist.

  11. If I was 17 I probably wouldn’t agree, but since I’m a bit older than that (a-hem), I think you’re both right.

  12. Richard says:

    By the way, I just finished listening to excerpts of Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Poems Of Bob Dylan and it is really awful, in this my opinion. If that’s the best classical contemporary composition, the state of classical composition is woeful indeed.

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